Reproducibility and Code

Putting TensorFlow back in PyTorch, back in TensorFlow (differentiable TensorFlow PyTorch adapters)

Do you have a codebase that uses TensorFlow and one that uses PyTorch and want to train a model that uses both end-to-end?

This library makes it possible without having to rewrite either codebase!

It allows you to wrap a TensorFlow graph to make it callable (and differentiable) through PyTorch, and vice-versa, using simple functions.

Code
Andreas Kirsch
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Reproducing the results from "Do Deep Generative Models Know What They Don't Know?"

PyTorch implementation of Glow that reproduces the results from “Do Deep Generative Models Know What They Don’t Know?” (Nalisnick et al.); Includes a pretrained model, evaluation notebooks and training code!

Code
Joost van Amersfoort
Link to this

Code for Bayesian Deep Learning Benchmarks

In order to make real-world difference with Bayesian Deep Learning (BDL) tools, the tools must scale to real-world settings. And for that we, the research community, must be able to evaluate our inference tools (and iterate quickly) with real-world benchmark tasks. We should be able to do this without necessarily worrying about application-specific domain knowledge, like the expertise often required in medical applications for example. We require benchmarks to test for inference robustness, performance, and accuracy, in addition to cost and effort of development. These benchmarks should be at a variety of scales, ranging from toy MNIST-scale benchmarks for fast development cycles, to large data benchmarks which are truthful to real-world applications, capturing their constraints.

Code
Angelos Filos, Sebastian Farquhar, Aidan Gomez, Tim G. J. Rudner, Zac Kenton, Lewis Smith, Milad Alizadeh, Yarin Gal
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Code for "An Ensemble of Bayesian Neural Networks for Exoplanetary Atmospheric Retrieval"

Recent work demonstrated the potential of using machine learning algorithms for atmospheric retrieval by implementing a random forest to perform retrievals in seconds that are consistent with the traditional, computationally-expensive nested-sampling retrieval method. We expand upon their approach by presenting a new machine learning model, exttt{plan-net}, based on an ensemble of Bayesian neural networks that yields more accurate inferences than the random forest for the same data set of synthetic transmission spectra.

Code, Publication
Adam D. Cobb, Michael D. Himes, Frank Soboczenski, Simone Zorzan, Molly D. O'Beirne, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Yarin Gal, Shawn D. Domagal-Goldman, Giada N. Arney, Daniel Angerhausen
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Code for Multi³Net (multitemporal satellite imagery segmentation)

We propose a novel approach for rapid segmentation of flooded buildings by fusing multiresolution, multisensor, and multitemporal satellite imagery in a convolutional neural network. Our model significantly expedites the generation of satellite imagery-based flood maps, crucial for first responders and local authorities in the early stages of flood events. By incorporating multitemporal satellite imagery, our model allows for rapid and accurate post-disaster damage assessment and can be used by governments to better coordinate medium- and long-term financial assistance programs for affected areas. The network consists of multiple streams of encoder-decoder architectures that extract spatiotemporal information from medium-resolution images and spatial information from high-resolution images before fusing the resulting representations into a single medium-resolution segmentation map of flooded buildings. We compare our model to state-of-the-art methods for building footprint segmentation as well as to alternative fusion approaches for the segmentation of flooded buildings and find that our model performs best on both tasks. We also demonstrate that our model produces highly accurate segmentation maps of flooded buildings using only publicly available medium-resolution data instead of significantly more detailed but sparsely available very high-resolution data. We release the first open-source dataset of fully preprocessed and labeled multiresolution, multispectral, and multitemporal satellite images of disaster sites along with our source code.

Code, Publication
Tim G. J. Rudner, Marc Rußwurm, Jakub Fil, Ramona Pelich, Benjamin Bischke, Veronika Kopackova, Piotr Bilinski
Link to this

More software here: software

Contact

We are located at
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Twitter: @OATML_Oxford
Github: OATML
Email: oatml@cs.ox.ac.uk


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