Deep Learning — Publications

Kessler : A machine learning library for spacecraft collision avoidance

As megaconstellations are launched and the space sector grows, space debris pollution is posing an increasing threat to operational spacecraft. Low Earth orbit is a junkyard of dead satellites, rocket bodies, shrapnels, and other debris that travel at very high speed in an uncontrolled manner. Collisions at orbital speeds can generate fragments and potentially trigger a cascade of more collisions endangering the whole population, a scenario known since the late 1970s as the Kessler syndrome. In this work we present Kessler: an open-source Python package for machine learning (ML) applied to collision avoidance. Kessler provides functionalities to import and export conjunction data messages (CDMs) in their standard format and predict the evolution of conjunction events based on explainable ML models. In Kessler we provide Bayesian recurrent neural networks that can be trained with existing collections of CDM data and then deployed in order to predict the contents of future CDMs in... [full abstract]


Giacomo Acciarini, Francesco Pinto, Francesca Letizia, José A. Martinez-Heras, Klaus Merz, Christopher Bridges, Atılım Güneş Baydin
8th European Conference on Space Debris
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Generating Interpretable Counterfactual Explanations By Implicit Minimisation of Epistemic and Aleatoric Uncertainties

Counterfactual explanations (CEs) are a practical tool for demonstrating why machine learning classifiers make particular decisions. For CEs to be useful, it is important that they are easy for users to interpret. Existing methods for generating interpretable CEs rely on auxiliary generative models, which may not be suitable for complex datasets, and incur engineering overhead. We introduce a simple and fast method for generating interpretable CEs in a white-box setting without an auxiliary model, by using the predictive uncertainty of the classifier. Our experiments show that our proposed algorithm generates more interpretable CEs, according to IM1 scores, than existing methods. Additionally, our approach allows us to estimate the uncertainty of a CE, which may be important in safety-critical applications, such as those in the medical domain.


Lisa Schut, Oscar Key, Rory McGrath, Luca Costabello, Bogdan Sacaleanu, Medb Corcoran, Yarin Gal
AISTATS, 2021
[Paper] [Code]
Link to this publication

Towards global flood mapping onboard low cost satellites with machine learning

Spaceborne Earth observation is a key technology for flood response, offering valuable information to decision makers on the ground. Very large constellations of small, nano satellites— ’CubeSats’ are a promising solution to reduce revisit time in disaster areas from days to hours. However, data transmission to ground receivers is limited by constraints on power and bandwidth of CubeSats. Onboard processing offers a solution to decrease the amount of data to transmit by reducing large sensor images to smaller data products. The ESA’s recent PhiSat-1 mission aims to facilitate the demonstration of this concept, providing the hardware capability to perform onboard processing by including a power-constrained machine learning accelerator and the software to run custom applications. This work demonstrates a flood segmentation algorithm that produces flood masks to be transmitted instead of the raw images, while running efficiently on the accelerator aboard the PhiSat-1. Our models ar... [full abstract]


Gonzalo Mateo-Garcia, Joshua Veitch-Michealis, Lewis Smith, Silviu Oprea, Guy Schumann, Yarin Gal, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Dietmar Backes
Nature Scientific Reports, 2021
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Interpretable Neural Architecture Search via Bayesian Optimisation with Weisfeiler-Lehman Kernels

Current neural architecture search (NAS) strategies focus only on finding a single, good, architecture. They offer little insight into why a specific network is performing well, or how we should modify the architecture if we want further improvements. We propose a Bayesian optimisation (BO) approach for NAS that combines the Weisfeiler-Lehman graph kernel with a Gaussian process surrogate. Our method not only optimises the architecture in a highly data-efficient manner, but also affords interpretability by discovering useful network features and their corresponding impact on the network performance. Moreover, our method is capable of capturing the topological structures of the architectures and is scalable to large graphs, thus making the high-dimensional and graph-like search spaces amenable to BO. We demonstrate empirically that our surrogate model is capable of identifying useful motifs which can guide the generation of new architectures. We finally show that our method outpe... [full abstract]


Binxin (Robin) Ru, Xingchen Wan, Xiaowen Dong, Michael A. Osborne
ICLR, 2021
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Invariant Representations for Reinforcement Learning without Reconstruction

We study how representation learning can accelerate reinforcement learning from rich observations, such as images, without relying either on domain knowledge or pixel-reconstruction. Our goal is to learn representations that provide for effective downstream control and invariance to task-irrelevant details. Bisimulation metrics quantify behavioral similarity between states in continuous MDPs, which we propose using to learn robust latent representations which encode only the task-relevant information from observations. Our method trains encoders such that distances in latent space equal bisimulation distances in state space. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method at disregarding task-irrelevant information using modified visual MuJoCo tasks, where the background is replaced with moving distractors and natural videos, while achieving SOTA performance. We also test a first-person highway driving task where our method learns invariance to clouds, weather, and time of day. F... [full abstract]


Amy Zhang, Rowan McAllister, Roberto Calandra, Yarin Gal, Sergey Levine
ICLR, 2021 (Oral)
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Improving VAEs' Robustness to Adversarial Attack

Variational autoencoders (VAEs) have recently been shown to be vulnerable to adversarial attacks, wherein they are fooled into reconstructing a chosen target image. However, how to defend against such attacks remains an open problem. We make significant advances in addressing this issue by introducing methods for producing adversarially robust VAEs. Namely, we first demonstrate that methods proposed to obtain disentangled latent representations produce VAEs that are more robust to these attacks. However, this robustness comes at the cost of reducing the quality of the reconstructions. We ameliorate this by applying disentangling methods to hierarchical VAEs. The resulting models produce high–fidelity autoencoders that are also adversarially robust. We confirm their capabilities on several different datasets and with current state-of-the-art VAE adversarial attacks, and also show that they increase the robustness of downstream tasks to attack.


Matthew JF Willetts, Alexander Camuto, Tom Rainforth, Steve Roberts, Christopher Holmes
ICLR, 2021
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Capturing Label Characteristics in VAEs

We present a principled approach to incorporating labels in variational autoencoders (VAEs) that captures the rich characteristic information associated with those labels. While prior work has typically conflated these by learning latent variables that directly correspond to label values, we argue this is contrary to the intended effect of supervision in VAEs—capturing rich label characteristics with the latents. For example, we may want to capture the characteristics of a face that make it look young, rather than just the age of the person. To this end, we develop a novel VAE model, the characteristic capturing VAE (CCVAE), which “reparameterizes” supervision through auxiliary variables and a concomitant variational objective. Through judicious structuring of mappings between latent and auxiliary variables, we show that the CCVAE can effectively learn meaningful representations of the characteristics of interest across a variety of supervision schemes. In particular, we show th... [full abstract]


Tom Joy, Sebastian Schmon, Philip Torr, Siddharth N, Tom Rainforth
ICLR, 2021
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Improving Transformation Invariance in Contrastive Representation Learning

We propose methods to strengthen the invariance properties of representations obtained by contrastive learning. While existing approaches implicitly induce a degree of invariance as representations are learned, we look to more directly enforce invariance in the encoding process. To this end, we first introduce a training objective for contrastive learning that uses a novel regularizer to control how the representation changes under transformation. We show that representations trained with this objective perform better on downstream tasks and are more robust to the introduction of nuisance transformations at test time. Second, we propose a change to how test time representations are generated by introducing a feature averaging approach that combines encodings from multiple transformations of the original input, finding that this leads to across the board performance gains. Finally, we introduce the novel Spirograph dataset to explore our ideas in the context of a differentiable g... [full abstract]


Adam Foster, Rattana Pukdee, Tom Rainforth
ICLR, 2021
[Paper]
Link to this publication

On Statistical Bias In Active Learning: How and When to Fix It

Active learning is a powerful tool when labelling data is expensive, but it introduces a bias because the training data no longer follows the population distribution. We formalize this bias and investigate the situations in which it can be harmful and sometimes even helpful. We further introduce novel corrective weights to remove bias when doing so is beneficial. Through this, our work not only provides a useful mechanism that can improve the active learning approach, but also an explanation for the empirical successes of various existing approaches which ignore this bias. In particular, we show that this bias can be actively helpful when training overparameterized models—like neural networks—with relatively modest dataset sizes.


Sebastian Farquhar, Yarin Gal, Tom Rainforth
ICLR, 2021 (Spotlight)
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Black-Box Optimization with Local Generative Surrogates

We propose a novel method for gradient-based optimization of black-box simulators using differentiable local surrogate models. In fields such as physics and engineering, many processes are modeled with non-differentiable simulators with intractable likelihoods. Optimization of these forward models is particularly challenging, especially when the simulator is stochastic. To address such cases, we introduce the use of deep generative models to iteratively approximate the simulator in local neighborhoods of the parameter space. We demonstrate that these local surrogates can be used to approximate the gradient of the simulator, and thus enable gradient-based optimization of simulator parameters. In cases where the dependence of the simulator on the parameter space is constrained to a low dimensional submanifold, we observe that our method attains minima faster than baseline methods, including Bayesian optimization, numerical optimization, and approaches using score function gradient... [full abstract]


Sergey Shirobokov, Vladislav Belavin, Michael Kagan, Andrey Ustyuzhanin, Atılım Güneş Baydin
Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 34 (NeurIPS)
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Large-scale clinical interpretation of genetic variants using evolutionary data and deep learning

Quantifying the pathogenicity of protein variants in human disease-related genes would have a profound impact on clinical decisions, yet the overwhelming majority (over 98%) of these variants still have unknown consequences. In principle, computational methods could support the large-scale interpretation of genetic variants. However, prior methods have relied on training machine learning models on available clinical labels. Since these labels are sparse, biased, and of variable quality, the resulting models have been considered insufficiently reliable. By contrast, our approach leverages deep generative models to predict the clinical significance of protein variants without relying on labels. The natural distribution of protein sequences we observe across organisms is the result of billions of evolutionary experiments. By modeling that distribution, we implicitly capture constraints on the protein sequences that maintain fitness. Our model EVE ... [full abstract]


Jonathan Frazer, Pascal Notin, Mafalda Dias, Aidan Gomez, Kelly Brock, Yarin Gal, Debora Marks
[bioRxiv]
Link to this publication

Global Earth Magnetic Field Modeling andForecasting with Spherical Harmonics Decomposition

Modeling and forecasting the solar wind-driven global magnetic field perturbations is an open challenge. Current approaches depend on simulations of computationally demanding models like the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model or sampling spatially and temporally through sparse ground-based stations (SuperMAG). In this paper, we develop a Deep Learning model that forecasts in Spherical Harmonics space, replacing reliance on MHD models and providing global coverage at oneminute cadence, improving over the current state-of-the-art which relies on feature engineering. We evaluate the performance in SuperMAG dataset (improved by 14.53%) and MHD simulations (improved by 24.35%). Additionally, we evaluate the extrapolation performance of the spherical harmonics reconstruction based on sparse ground-based stations (SuperMAG), showing that spherical harmonics can reliably reconstruct the global magnetic field as evaluated on MHD simulation


Panagiotis Tigas, Téo Bloch, Vishal Upendran, Banafsheh Ferdoushi, Yarin Gal, Siddha Ganju, Ryan M. McGranaghan, Mark C. M. Cheung, Asti Bhatt
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop - 34th NeurIPS 2020 [Paper]
Determining new representations of “Geoeffectiveness” using deep learning - AGU 2020
Link to this publication

On the robustness of effectiveness estimation of nonpharmaceutical interventions against COVID-19 transmission

There remains much uncertainty about the relative effectiveness of different nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) against COVID-19 transmission. Several studies attempt to infer NPI effectiveness with cross-country, data-driven modelling, by linking from NPI implementation dates to the observed timeline of cases and deaths in a country. These models make many assumptions. Previous work sometimes tests the sensitivity to variations in explicit epidemiological model parameters, but rarely analyses the sensitivity to the assumptions that are made by the choice the of model structure (structural sensitivity analysis). Such analysis would ensure that the inferences made are consistent under plausible alternative assumptions. Without it, NPI effectiveness estimates cannot be used to guide policy. We investigate four model structures similar to a recent state-of-the-art Bayesian hierarchical model. We find that the models differ considerably in the robustness of their NPI effectivene... [full abstract]


Mrinank Sharma, Sören Mindermann, Jan Brauner, Gavin Leech, Anna B. Stephenson, Tomáš Gavenčiak, Jan Kulveit, Yee Whye Teh, Leonid Chindelevitch, Yarin Gal
NeurIPS, 2020
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Capsule Networks: A Generative Probabilistic Perspective

‘Capsule’ models try to explicitly represent the poses of objects, enforcing a linear relationship between an objects pose and those of its constituent parts. This modelling assumption should lead to robustness to viewpoint changes since the object-component relationships are invariant to the poses of the object. We describe a probabilistic generative model that encodes these assumptions. Our probabilistic formulation separates the generative assumptions of the model from the inference scheme, which we derive from a variational bound. We experimentally demonstrate the applicability of our unified objective, and the use of test time optimisation to solve problems inherent to amortised inference.


Lewis Smith, Lisa Schut, Yarin Gal, Mark van der Wilk
Object Oriented Learning Workshop, ICML 2020
[Paper]
Link to this publication

SliceOut: Training Transformers and CNNs faster while using less memory

We demonstrate 10-40% speedups and memory reduction with Wide ResNets, EfficientNets, and Transformer models, with minimal to no loss in accuracy, using SliceOut—a new dropout scheme designed to take advantage of GPU memory layout. By dropping contiguous sets of units at random, our method preserves the regularization properties of dropout while allowing for more efficient low-level implementation, resulting in training speedups through (1) fast memory access and matrix multiplication of smaller tensors, and (2) memory savings by avoiding allocating memory to zero units in weight gradients and activations. Despite its simplicity, our method is highly effective. We demonstrate its efficacy at scale with Wide ResNets & EfficientNets on CIFAR10/100 and ImageNet, as well as Transformers on the LM1B dataset. These speedups and memory savings in training can lead to CO2 emissions reduction of up to 40% for training large models.


Pascal Notin, Aidan Gomez, Joanna Yoo, Yarin Gal
Under review
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Invariant Causal Prediction for Block MDPs

Generalization across environments is critical to the successful application of reinforcement learning algorithms to real-world challenges. In this paper, we consider the problem of learning abstractions that generalize in block MDPs, families of environments with a shared latent state space and dynamics structure over that latent space, but varying observations. We leverage tools from causal inference to propose a method of invariant prediction to learn model-irrelevance state abstractions (MISA) that generalize to novel observations in the multi-environment setting. We prove that for certain classes of environments, this approach outputs with high probability a state abstraction corresponding to the causal feature set with respect to the return. We further provide more general bounds on model error and generalization error in the multi-environment setting, in the process showing a connection between causal variable selection and the state abstraction framework for MDPs. We giv... [full abstract]


Amy Zhang, Clare Lyle, Shagun Sodhani, Angelos Filos, Marta Kwiatkowska, Joelle Pineau, Yarin Gal, Doina Precup
Causal Learning for Decision Making Workshop at ICLR, 2020
[Paper]
ICML, 2020
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Divide, Conquer, and Combine: a New Inference Strategy for Probabilistic Programs with Stochastic Support

Universal probabilistic programming systems (PPSs) provide a powerful framework for specifying rich and complex probabilistic models. They further attempt to automate the process of drawing inferences from these models, but doing this successfully is severely hampered by the wide range of non–standard models they can express. As a result, although one can specify complex models in a universal PPS, the provided inference engines often fall far short of what is required. In particular, we show they produce surprisingly unsatisfactory performance for models where the support may vary between executions, often doing no better than importance sampling from the prior. To address this, we introduce a new inference framework: Divide, Conquer, and Combine, which remains efficient for such models, and show how it can be implemented as an automated and general-purpose PPS inference engine. We empirically demonstrate substantial performance improvements over existing approaches on two examp... [full abstract]


Yuan Zhou, Hongseok Yang, Yee Whye Teh, Tom Rainforth
ICML, 2020
[Paper]
Link to this publication

Try Depth Instead of Weight Correlations: Mean-field is a Less Restrictive Assumption for Deeper Networks

We challenge the longstanding assumption that the mean-field approximation for variational inference in Bayesian neural networks is severely restrictive. We argue mathematically that full-covariance approximations only improve the ELBO if they improve the expected log-likelihood. We further show that deeper mean-field networks are able to express predictive distributions approximately equivalent to shallower full-covariance networks. We validate these observations empirically, demonstrating that deeper models decrease the divergence between diagonal- and full-covariance Gaussian fits to the true posterior.


Sebastian Farquhar, Lewis Smith, Yarin Gal
Contributed talk, Workshop on Bayesian Deep Learning, NeurIPS 2019
[Workshop paper], [arXiv]
Link to this publication

Gradient \(\ell_1\) Regularization for Quantization Robustness

We analyze the effect of quantizing weights and activations of neural networks on their loss and derive a simple regularization scheme that improves robustness against post-training quantization. By training quantization-ready networks, our approach enables storing a single set of weights that can be quantized on-demand to different bit-widths as energy and memory requirements of the application change. Unlike quantization-aware training using the straight-through estimator that only targets a specific bit-width and requires access to training data and pipeline, our regularization-based method paves the way for ``on the fly’’ post-training quantization to various bit-widths. We show that by modeling quantization as a -bounded perturbation, the first-order term in the loss expansion can be regularized using the -norm of gradients. We experimentally validate our method on different architectures on ... [full abstract]


Milad Alizadeh, Arash Behboodi, Mart van Baalen, Christos Louizos, Tijmen Blankevoort, Max Welling
ICLR, 2020
[OpenReview]
Link to this publication

BayesOpt Adversarial Attack

Black-box adversarial attacks require a large number of attempts before finding successful adversarial examples that are visually indistinguishable from the original input. Current approaches relying on substitute model training, gradient estimation or genetic algorithms often require an excessive number of queries. Therefore, they are not suitable for real-world systems where the maximum query number is limited due to cost. We propose a query-efficient black-box attack which uses Bayesian optimisation in combination with Bayesian model selection to optimise over the adversarial perturbation and the optimal degree of search space dimension reduction. We demonstrate empirically that our method can achieve comparable success rates with 2-5 times fewer queries compared to previous state-of-the-art black-box attacks.


Binxin (Robin) Ru, Adam Cobb, Arno Blaas, Yarin Gal
ICLR, 2020
[OpenReview]
Link to this publication

Using U-Nets to Create High-Fidelity Virtual Observations of the Solar Corona

Understanding and monitoring the complex and dynamic processes of the Sun is important for a number of human activities on Earth and in space. For this reason, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been continuously monitoring the multi-layered Sun’s atmosphere in high-resolution since its launch in 2010, generating terabytes of observational data every day. The synergy between machine learning and this enormous amount of data has the potential, still largely unexploited, to advance our understanding of the Sun and extend the capabilities of heliophysics missions. In the present work, we show that deep learning applied to SDO data can be successfully used to create a high-fidelity virtual telescope that generates synthetic observations of the solar corona by image translation. Towards this end we developed a deep neural network, structured as an encoder-decoder with skip connections (U-Net), that reconstructs the Sun’s image of one instrument channel given temporally align... [full abstract]


Valentina Salvatelli, Souvik Bose, Brad Neuberg, Luiz F. G. dos Santos, Mark Cheung, Miho Janvier, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Yarin Gal, Meng Jin
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop (ML4PS), NeurIPS 2019
[arXiv]
Link to this publication

Auto-Calibration of Remote Sensing Solar Telescopes with Deep Learning

As a part of NASA’s Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO) fleet of satellites,the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has continuously monitored the Sun since2010. Ultraviolet (UV) and Extreme UV (EUV) instruments in orbit, such asSDO’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument, suffer time-dependent degradation which reduces instrument sensitivity. Accurate calibration for (E)UV instruments currently depends on periodic sounding rockets, which are infrequent and not practical for heliophysics missions in deep space. In the present work, we develop a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) that auto-calibrates SDO/AIA channels and corrects sensitivity degradation by exploiting spatial patterns in multi-wavelength observations to arrive at a self-calibration of (E)UV imaging instruments. Our results remove a major impediment to developing future HSOmissions of the same scientific caliber as SDO but in deep space, able to observe the Sun from more vantage points than just SDO’s curren... [full abstract]


Brad Neuberg, Souvik Bose, Valentina Salvatelli, Luiz F.G. dos Santos, Mark Cheung, Miho Janvier, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Yarin Gal, Meng Jin
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop (ML4PS), NeurIPS 2019
[arXiv]
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PAC-Bayes Generalization Bounds for Invariant Neural Networks

Invariance is widely described as a desirable property of neural networks, but the mechanisms by which it benefits deep learning remain shrouded in mystery. We show that building invariance into model architecture via feature averaging provably tightens PAC-Bayes generalization bounds, as compared to data augmentation. Furthermore, through a link to the marginal likelihood and Bayesian model selection, we provide justification for using the improvement in these bounds for model selection. Our key observation is that invariance doesn’t just reduce variance in deep learning: it also changes the parameter-function mapping, and this leads better provable guarantees for the model. We verify our theoretical results empirically on a permutation-invariant dataset.


Clare Lyle, Marta Kwiatkowska, Yarin Gal
14th Women in Machine Learning Workshop (WiML 2019)
[WiML]
Link to this publication

Prediction of GNSS Phase Scintillations: A Machine Learning Approach

A Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) uses a constellation of satellites around the earth for accurate navigation, timing, and positioning. Natural phenomena like space weather introduce irregularities in the Earth’s ionosphere, disrupting the propagation of the radio signals that GNSS relies upon. Such disruptions affect both the amplitude and the phase of the propagated waves. No physics-based model currently exists to predict the time and location of these disruptions with sufficient accuracy and at relevant scales. In this paper, we focus on predicting the phase fluctuations of GNSS radio waves, known as phase scintillations. We propose a novel architecture and loss function to predict 1 hour in advance the magnitude of phase scintillations within a time window of plus-minus 5 minutes with state-of-the-art performance.


Kara Lamb, Garima Malhotra, Athanasios Vlontzos, Edward Wagstaff, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Anahita Bhiwandiwalla, Yarin Gal, Freddie Kalaitzis, Anthony Reina, Asti Bhatt
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop (ML4PS), NeurIPS 2019
[arXiv]
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Correlation of Auroral Dynamics and GNSS Scintillation with an Autoencoder

High energy particles originating from solar activity travel along the the Earth’s magnetic field and interact with the atmosphere around the higher latitudes. These interactions often manifest as aurora in the form of visible light in the Earth’s ionosphere. These interactions also result in irregularities in the electron density, which cause disruptions in the amplitude and phase of the radio signals from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), known as ‘scintillation’. In this paper we use a multi-scale residual autoencoder (Res-AE) to show the correlation between specific dynamic structures of the aurora and the magnitude of the GNSS phase scintillations (σϕ). Auroral images are encoded in a lower dimensional feature space using the Res-AE, which in turn are clustered with t-SNE and UMAP. Both methods produce similar clusters, and specific clusters demonstrate greater correlations with observed phase scintillations. Our results suggest that specific dynamic structure... [full abstract]


Kara Lamb, Garima Malhotra, Athanasios Vlontzos, Edward Wagstaff, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Anahita Bhiwandiwalla, Yarin Gal, Freddie Kalaitzis, Anthony Reina, Asti Bhatt
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop (ML4PS), NeurIPS 2019
[arXiv]
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Single-Frame Super-Resolution of Solar Magnetograms: Investigating Physics-Based Metrics & Losses

Breakthroughs in our understanding of physical phenomena have traditionally followed improvements in instrumentation. Studies of the magnetic field of the Sun, and its influence on the solar dynamo and space weather events, have benefited from improvements in resolution and measurement frequency of new instruments. However, in order to fully understand the solar cycle, high-quality data across time-scales longer than the typical lifespan of a solar instrument are required. At the moment, discrepancies between measurement surveys prevent the combined use of all available data. In this work, we show that machine learning can help bridge the gap between measurement surveys by learning to super-resolve low-resolution magnetic field images and translate between characteristics of contemporary instruments in orbit. We also introduce the notion of physics-based metrics and losses for super-resolution to preserve underlying physics and constrain the solution space of possible super-reso... [full abstract]


Anna Jungbluth, Xavier Gitiaux, Shane A.Maloney, Carl Shneider, Paul J. Wright, Freddie Kalaitzis, Michel Deudon, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Yarin Gal, Andrés Muñoz-Jaramillo
Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences Workshop (ML4PS), NeurIPS 2019
[arXiv]
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Flood Detection On Low Cost Orbital Hardware

Satellite imaging is a critical technology for monitoring and responding to natural disasters such as flooding. Despite the capabilities of modern satellites, there is still much to be desired from the perspective of first response organisations like UNICEF. Two main challenges are rapid access to data, and the ability to automatically identify flooded regions in images. We describe a prototypical flood segmentation system, identifying cloud, water and land, that could be deployed on a constellation of small satellites, performing processing on board to reduce downlink bandwidth by 2 orders of magnitude. We target PhiSat-1, part of the FSSCAT mission, which is planned to be launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) near the start of 2020 as a proof of concept for this new technology.


Joshua Veitch-Michaelis, Gonzalo Mateo-Garcia, Silviu Oprea, Lewis Smith, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Dietmar Backes, Yarin Gal, Guy Schumann
Spotlight talk, Artificial Intelligence for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response (AI+HADR) NeurIPS 2019 Workshop
[arXiv]
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FDL: Mission Support Challenge

The Frontier Development Lab (FDL) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) machine learning program with the stated aim of conducting artificial intelligence research for space exploration and all humankind with support in the European program from the European Space Agency (ESA). Interdisciplinary teams of researchers and data-scientists are brought together to tackle a range of challenging, real-world problems in the space-domain. The program primarily consists of a sprint phase during which teams tackle separate problems in the spirit of ‘coopetition’. Teams are given a problem brief by real stakeholders and mentored by a range of experts. With access to exceptional computational resources, we were challenged to make a serious contribution within just eight weeks. Stated simply, our team was tasked with producing a system capable of scheduling downloads from satellites autonomously. Scheduling is a difficult problem in general, of course, complicated further... [full abstract]


Luís F. Simões, Ben Day, Vinutha M. Shreenath, Callum Wilson, Chris Bridges, Sylvester Kaczmarek, Yarin Gal
NeurIPS 2019 Workshop on Machine Learning Competitions for All
[arXiv]
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Machine Learning for Generalizable Prediction of Flood Susceptibility

Flooding is a destructive and dangerous hazard and climate change appears to be increasing the frequency of catastrophic flooding events around the world. Physics-based flood models are costly to calibrate and are rarely generalizable across different river basins, as model outputs are sensitive to site-specific parameters and human-regulated infrastructure. In contrast, statistical models implicitly account for such factors through the data on which they are trained. Such models trained primarily from remotely-sensed Earth observation data could reduce the need for extensive in-situ measurements. In this work, we develop generalizable, multi-basin models of river flooding susceptibility using geographically-distributed data from the USGS stream gauge network. Machine learning models are trained in a supervised framework to predict two measures of flood susceptibility from a mix of river basin attributes, impervious surface cover information derived from satellite imagery, and h... [full abstract]


Chelsea Sidrane, Dylan J Fitzpatrick, Andrew Annex, Diane O’Donoghue, Piotr Bilinksi, Yarin Gal
Spotlight talk, Artificial Intelligence for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response (AI+HADR) NeurIPS 2019 Workshop
[arXiv]
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Location Conditional Image Generation using Generative Adversarial Networks

Can an AI-artist instil the emotion of sense of place in its audience? Motivated by this thought, this paper presents our endeavours to make a GANs model learn the visual characteristics of locations to achieve creativity. The project’s novelty lies in addressing the problem of the hardness of GANs training for an extremely diverse dataset in a contextual setting. The project explores GANs as an impressionist artist who adds its perspective to the artwork without hampering photo realism.


Mayur Saxena, Aidan Gomez, Yarin Gal
Machine Learning for Creativity and Design NeurIPS 2019 Workshop
[Paper]
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The Natural Neural Tangent Kernel: Neural Network Training Dynamics under Natural Gradient Descent

Gradient-based optimization methods have proven successful in learning complex, overparameterized neural networks from non-convex objectives. Yet, the precise theoretical relationship between gradient-based optimization methods, the induced training dynamics, and generalization in deep neural networks remains unclear. In this work, we investigate the training dynamics of overparameterized neural networks under natural gradient descent. Taking a function-space view of the training dynamics, we give an exact analytic solution to the training dynamics on training points. We derive a bound on the discrepancy between the distributions over functions at the global optimum of natural gradient descent and the analytic solution to the natural gradient descent training dynamics linearized around the parameters at initialization and validate our theoretical results empirically. In particular, we show that the discrepancy between the functions obtained from linearized and non-linearized nat... [full abstract]


Tim G. J. Rudner, Florian Wenzel, Yee Whye Teh, Yarin Gal
Contributed talk, Workshop on Bayesian Deep Learning, NeurIPS 2019
[Paper]
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On the Benefits of Disentangled Representations

Recently there has been a significant interest in learning disentangled representations, as they promise increased interpretability, generalization to unseen scenarios and faster learning on downstream tasks. In this paper, we investigate the usefulness of different notions of disentanglement for improving the fairness of downstream prediction tasks based on representations. We consider the setting where the goal is to predict a target variable based on the learned representation of high-dimensional observations (such as images) that depend on both the target variable and an unobserved sensitive variable. We show that in this setting both the optimal and empirical predictions can be unfair, even if the target variable and the sensitive variable are independent. Analyzing more than 12600 trained representations of state-of-the-art disentangled models, we observe that various disentanglement scores are consistently correlated with increased fairness, suggesting that disentanglemen... [full abstract]


Francesco Locatello, Gabriele Abbati, Tom Rainforth, Stefan Bauer, Bernhard Schölkopf, Olivier Bachem
NeurIPS, 2019
[arXiv]
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Variational Bayesian Optimal Experimental Design

Bayesian optimal experimental design (BOED) is a principled framework for making efficient use of limited experimental resources. Unfortunately, its applicability is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining accurate estimates of the expected information gain (EIG) of an experiment. To address this, we introduce several classes of fast EIG estimators by building on ideas from amortized variational inference. We show theoretically and empirically that these estimators can provide significant gains in speed and accuracy over previous approaches. We further demonstrate the practicality of our approach on a number of end-to-end experiments.


Adam Foster, Martin Jankowiak, Eli Bingham, Paul Horsfall, Yee Whye Teh, Tom Rainforth, Noah Goodman
NeurIPS, 2019
[arXiv]
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An Analysis of the Effect of Invariance on Generalization in Neural Networks

Invariance is often cited as a desirable property of machine learning systems, claimed to improve model accuracy and reduce overfitting. Empirically, invariant models often generalize better than their non-invariant counterparts. But is it possible to show that invariant models provably do so? In this paper we explore the effect of invariance on model generalization. We find strong Bayesian and frequentist motivations for enforcing invariance which leverage recent results connecting PAC-Bayes generalization bounds and the marginal likelihood. We make use of these results to perform model selection on neural networks.


Clare Lyle, Marta Kwiatkowska, Mark van der Wilk, Yarin Gal
Understanding and Improving Generalization in Deep Learning workshop, ICML, 2019
[Paper]
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Towards Inverse Reinforcement Learning for Limit Order Book Dynamics

We investigate whether Inverse Reinforcement Learning (IRL) can infer rewards from agents within real financial stochastic environments: limit order books (LOB). Our results illustrate that complex behaviours, induced by non-linear reward functions amid agent-based stochastic scenarios, can be deduced through inference, encouraging the use of inverse reinforcement learning for opponent-modelling in multi-agent systems.


Jacobo Roa-Vicens, Cyrine Chtourou, Angelos Filos, Francisco Rullan, Yarin Gal, Ricardo Silva
Oral Presentation, Multi-Agent Learning Workshop at the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning, 2019
[arXiv] [BibTex]
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Multi³Net: Segmenting Flooded Buildings via Fusion of Multiresolution, Multisensor, and Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

We propose a novel approach for rapid segmentation of flooded buildings by fusing multiresolution, multisensor, and multitemporal satellite imagery in a convolutional neural network. Our model significantly expedites the generation of satellite imagery-based flood maps, crucial for first responders and local authorities in the early stages of flood events. By incorporating multitemporal satellite imagery, our model allows for rapid and accurate post-disaster damage assessment and can be used by governments to better coordinate medium- and long-term financial assistance programs for affected areas. The network consists of multiple streams of encoder-decoder architectures that extract spatiotemporal information from medium-resolution images and spatial information from high-resolution images before fusing the resulting representations into a single medium-resolution segmentation map of flooded buildings. We compare our model to state-of-the-art methods for building footprint segme... [full abstract]


Tim G. J. Rudner, Marc Rußwurm, Jakub Fil, Ramona Pelich, Benjamin Bischke, Veronika Kopackova, Piotr Bilinski
AAAI 2019
NeurIPS 2018 Workshop AI for Social Good
[arXiv] [Code] [BibTex] [Media]
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Targeted Dropout

Neural networks are extremely flexible models due to their large number of parameters, which is beneficial for learning, but also highly redundant. This makes it possible to compress neural networks without having a drastic effect on performance. We introduce targeted dropout, a strategy for post hoc pruning of neural network weights and units that builds the pruning mechanism directly into learning. At each weight update, targeted dropout selects a candidate set for pruning using a simple selection criterion, and then stochastically prunes the network via dropout applied to this set. The resulting network learns to be explicitly robust to pruning, comparing favourably to more complicated regularization schemes while at the same time being extremely simple to implement, and easy to tune.


Aidan Gomez, Ivan Zhang, Kevin Swersky, Yarin Gal, Geoffrey E. Hinton
Workshop on Compact Deep Neural Networks with industrial applications, NeurIPS 2018
[Paper] [BibTex]
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An Empirical study of Binary Neural Networks' Optimisation

Binary neural networks using the Straight-Through-Estimator (STE) have been shown to achieve state-of-the-art results, but their training process is not well-founded. This is due to the discrepancy between the evaluated function in the forward path, and the weight updates in the back-propagation, updates which do not correspond to gradients of the forward path. Efficient convergence and accuracy of binary models often rely on careful fine-tuning and various ad-hoc techniques. In this work, we empirically identify and study the effectiveness of the various ad-hoc techniques commonly used in the literature, providing best-practices for efficient training of binary models. We show that adapting learning rates using second moment methods is crucial for the successful use of the STE, and that other optimisers can easily get stuck in local minima. We also find that many of the commonly employed tricks are only effective towards the end of the training, with these methods making early ... [full abstract]


Milad Alizadeh, Javier Fernández-Marqués, Nicholas D. Lane, Yarin Gal
International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), 2019
[Paper] [Code]
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Automating Asteroid Shape Modeling From Radar Images

Characterizing the shapes and spin states of near-Earth asteroids is essential both for trajectory predictions to rule out potential future Earth impacts and for planning spacecraft missions. But reconstructing objects’ shapes and spins from delay-Doppler data is a computationally intensive inversion problem. We implement a Bayesian optimization routine that uses SHAPE to autonomously search the space of spin-state parameters, yielding spin state constraints within a factor of 3 less computer runtime and minimal human supervision. These routines are now being incorporated into radar data processing pipelines at Arecibo.


Michael W. Busch, Agata Rozek, Sean Marshall, Grace Young, Adam Cobb, Chedy Raissi, Yarin Gal, Lance Benner, Shantanu Naidu, Marina Brozovic, Patrick Taylor
COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) Assembly, 2018
[Program] [Blog Post (Adam Cobb)] [BibTex]
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Using Pre-trained Full-Precision Models to Speed Up Training Binary Networks For Mobile Devices

Binary Neural Networks (BNNs) are well-suited for deploying Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) to small embedded devices but state-of-the-art BNNs need to be trained from scratch. We show how weights from a trained full-precision model can be used to speed-up training binary networks. We show that for CIFAR-10, accuracies within 1% of the full-precision model can be achieved in just 5 epochs.


Milad Alizadeh, Nicholas D. Lane, Yarin Gal
16th ACM International Conference on Mobile Systems (MobiSys), 2018
[Abstract] [BibTex]
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