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Neil Band

MSc by Research (2020—2022)

Neil is an MSc by Research student in the Oxford Applied and Theoretical Machine Learning Group (OATML) under the supervision of Yarin Gal. He is interested in Bayesian and graph deep learning with applications in computational biology and autonomy. He has worked on machine learning methods for the inference of Alzheimer’s Disease progression with Manolis Kellis in the MIT Computational Biology Group, and on neural network memory optimization with Stratos Idreos in the Harvard Data Systems Lab. Neil obtained his undergraduate degree in computer science and economics at Harvard College, and is a Rhodes Scholar.


Publications while at OATMLNews items mentioning Neil BandReproducibility and CodeBlog Posts

Publications while at OATML:

Plex: Towards Reliability using Pretrained Large Model Extensions

A recent trend in artificial intelligence is the use of pretrained models for language and vision tasks, which have achieved extraordinary performance but also puzzling failures. Probing these models' abilities in diverse ways is therefore critical to the field. In this paper, we explore the reliability of models, where we define a reliable model as one that not only achieves strong predictive performance but also performs well consistently over many decision-making tasks involving uncertainty (e.g., selective prediction, open set recognition), robust generalization (e.g., accuracy and proper scoring rules such as log-likelihood on in- and out-of-distribution datasets), and adaptation (e.g., active learning, few-shot uncertainty). We devise 10 types of tasks over 40 datasets in order to evaluate different aspects of reliability on both vision and language domains. To improve reliability, we developed ViT-Plex and T5-Plex, pretrained large model extensions for vision and language mo... [full abstract]


Dustin Tran, Jeremiah Liu, Michael W. Dusenberry, Du Phan, Mark Collier, Jie Ren, Kehang Han, Zi Wang, Zelda Mariet, Huiyi Hu, Neil Band, Tim G. J. Rudner, Karan Singhal, Zachary Nado, Joost van Amersfoort, Andreas Kirsch, Rodolphe Jenatton, Nithum Thain, Honglin Yuan, Kelly Buchanan, Kevin Murphy, D. Sculley, Yarin Gal, Zoubin Ghahramani, Jasper Snoek, Balaji Lakshminarayan
Contributed Talk, ICML Pre-training Workshop, 2022
[OpenReview] [Code] [BibTex] [Google AI Blog Post]

Benchmarking Bayesian Deep Learning on Diabetic Retinopathy Detection Tasks

Bayesian deep learning seeks to equip deep neural networks with the ability to precisely quantify their predictive uncertainty, and has promised to make deep learning more reliable for safety-critical real-world applications. Yet, existing Bayesian deep learning methods fall short of this promise; new methods continue to be evaluated on unrealistic test beds that do not reflect the complexities of downstream real-world tasks that would benefit most from reliable uncertainty quantification. We propose a set of real-world tasks that accurately reflect such complexities and are designed to assess the reliability of predictive models in safety-critical scenarios. Specifically, we curate two publicly available datasets of high-resolution human retina images exhibiting varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy, a medical condition that can lead to blindness, and use them to design a suite of automated diagnosis tasks that require reliable predictive uncertainty quantification. We use these... [full abstract]


Neil Band, Tim G. J. Rudner, Qixuan Feng, Angelos Filos, Zachary Nado, Michael W. Dusenberry, Ghassen Jerfel, Dustin Tran, Yarin Gal
NeurIPS Datasets and Benchmarks Track, 2021
Spotlight Talk, NeurIPS Workshop on Distribution Shifts, 2021
Symposium on Machine Learning for Health (ML4H) Extended Abstract Track, 2021
NeurIPS Workshop on Bayesian Deep Learning, 2021
[OpenReview] [Code] [BibTex]

Uncertainty Baselines: Benchmarks for Uncertainty & Robustness in Deep Learning

High-quality estimates of uncertainty and robustness are crucial for numerous real-world applications, especially for deep learning which underlies many deployed ML systems. The ability to compare techniques for improving these estimates is therefore very important for research and practice alike. Yet, competitive comparisons of methods are often lacking due to a range of reasons, including: compute availability for extensive tuning, incorporation of sufficiently many baselines, and concrete documentation for reproducibility. In this paper we introduce Uncertainty Baselines: high-quality implementations of standard and state-of-the-art deep learning methods on a variety of tasks. As of this writing, the collection spans 19 methods across 9 tasks, each with at least 5 metrics. Each baseline is a self-contained experiment pipeline with easily reusable and extendable components. Our goal is to provide immediate starting points for experimentation with new methods or applications. Addi... [full abstract]


Zachary Nado, Neil Band, Mark Collier, Josip Djolonga, Michael W. Dusenberry, Sebastian Farquhar, Angelos Filos, Marton Havasi, Rodolphe Jenatton, Ghassen Jerfel, Jeremiah Liu, Zelda Mariet, Jeremy Nixon, Shreyas Padhy, Jie Ren, Tim G. J. Rudner, Yeming Wen, Florian Wenzel, Kevin Murphy, D. Sculley, Balaji Lakshminarayanan, Jasper Snoek, Yarin Gal, Dustin Tran
NeurIPS Workshop on Bayesian Deep Learning, 2021
[arXiv] [Code] [Blog Post (Google AI)] [BibTex]

Shifts: A Dataset of Real Distributional Shift Across Multiple Large-Scale Tasks

There has been significant research done on developing methods for improving robustness to distributional shift and uncertainty estimation. In contrast, only limited work has examined developing standard datasets and benchmarks for assessing these approaches. Additionally, most work on uncertainty estimation and robustness has developed new techniques based on small-scale regression or image classification tasks. However, many tasks of practical interest have different modalities, such as tabular data, audio, text, or sensor data, which offer significant challenges involving regression and discrete or continuous structured prediction. Thus, given the current state of the field, a standardized large-scale dataset of tasks across a range of modalities affected by distributional shifts is necessary. This will enable researchers to meaningfully evaluate the plethora of recently developed uncertainty quantification methods, as well as assessment criteria and state-of-the-art baselines.... [full abstract]


Andrey Malinin, Neil Band, Alexander Ganshin, German Chesnokov, Yarin Gal, Mark J. F. Gales, Alexey Noskov, Andrey Ploskonosov, Liudmila Prokhorenkova, Ivan Provilkov, Vatsal Raina, Vyas Raina, Denis Roginskiy, Mariya Shmatova, Panagiotis Tigas, Boris Yangel
NeurIPS Datasets and Benchmarks Track, 2021
[arXiv] [BibTex] [Code]
[Competition Website] [Blog Post (OATML)] [Blog Post (Yandex Research)]

Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning

We challenge a common assumption underlying most supervised deep learning: that a model makes a prediction depending only on its parameters and the features of a single input. To this end, we introduce a general-purpose deep learning architecture that takes as input the entire dataset instead of processing one datapoint at a time. Our approach uses self-attention to reason about relationships between datapoints explicitly, which can be seen as realizing non-parametric models using parametric attention mechanisms. However, unlike conventional non-parametric models, we let the model learn end-to-end from the data how to make use of other datapoints for prediction. Empirically, our models solve cross-datapoint lookup and complex reasoning tasks unsolvable by traditional deep learning models. We show highly competitive results on tabular data, early results on CIFAR-10, and give insight into how the model makes use of the interactions between points.


Jannik Kossen, Neil Band, Clare Lyle, Aidan Gomez, Yarin Gal, Tom Rainforth
NeurIPS, 2021
[arXiv] [Code]
More publications on Google Scholar.

News items mentioning Neil Band:

OATML to co-organize the Workshop on Computational Biology at ICML 2022

OATML to co-organize the Workshop on Computational Biology at ICML 2022

04 May 2022

OATML student Pascal Notin is co-organizing the 7th edition of the Workshop on Computational Biology (WCB) at ICML 2022 jointly with collaborators at Harvard, Columbia, Cornell and others. OATML students Neil Band, Freddie Bickford Smith, Jan Brauner, Andreas Kirsch and Lood Van Niekerk are part of the PC.

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NeurIPS 2021

NeurIPS 2021

11 Oct 2021

Thirteen papers with OATML members accepted to NeurIPS 2021 main conference. More information in our blog post.

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NeurIPS 2021 Workshop and Challenges

NeurIPS 2021 Workshop and Challenges

30 Aug 2021

We’re co-organising the Bayesian Deep Learning Workshop at NeurIPS 2021 as well as two challenges: Approximate Inference in Bayesian Deep Learning and Shifts Challenge: Robustness and Uncertainty under Real-World Distributional Shift. This effort is led by Professor Yarin Gal, Neil Band, Sebastian Farquhar, and collaborators.

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OATML researchers to present at Stanford University Lecture Course CS25: Transformers United

OATML researchers to present at Stanford University Lecture Course CS25: Transformers United

22 Aug 2021

OATML graduate students Aidan Gomez, Jannik Kossen, and Neil Band will be presenting their recent paper Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning that introduces Non-Parametric Transformers at the Stanford Lecture Course ‘CS25: Transformers United’ on November 1, 2021. Professor Yarin Gal, Dr. Tom Rainforth, and OATML DPhil student Clare Lyle are co-authors on the paper.

The lecture is available online here.

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OATML researchers to speak at Google Research

OATML researchers to speak at Google Research

22 Aug 2021

OATML students Jannik Kossen and Neil Band will be presenting their recent paper Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning at Google Research on September 14, 2021. Professor Yarin Gal, Dr. Tom Rainforth, and OATML DPhil students Clare Lyle and Aidan Gomez are co-authors on the paper.

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OATML researcher presents at AI Campus Berlin

OATML researcher presents at AI Campus Berlin

06 Aug 2021

OATML DPhil student Jannik Kossen gives invited talks at AI Campus Berlin on two recent papers: Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning and Active Testing: Sample-Efficient Model Evaluation. Recordings of are available upon request. Announcements are here and here. Professor Yarin Gal, Dr. Tom Rainforth, and OATML graduate students Sebastian Farquhar, Neil Band, Clare Lyle, and Aidan Gomez are co-authors on the papers.

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OATML researchers to speak at Cohere

OATML researchers to speak at Cohere

09 Jul 2021

OATML students Jannik Kossen and Neil Band present their recent paper Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning at Cohere on July 9, 2021. Professor Yarin Gal, Dr. Tom Rainforth, and OATML DPhil students Clare Lyle and Aidan Gomez are also co-authors on the paper.

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Blog Posts

OATML at ICML 2022

OATML group members and collaborators are proud to present 11 papers at the ICML 2022 main conference and workshops. Group members are also co-organizing the Workshop on Computational Biology, and the Oxford Wom*n Social. …

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Sören Mindermann, Jan Brauner, Muhammed Razzak, Andreas Kirsch, Aidan Gomez, Sebastian Farquhar, Pascal Notin, Tim G. J. Rudner, Freddie Bickford Smith, Neil Band, Panagiotis Tigas, Andrew Jesson, Lars Holdijk, Joost van Amersfoort, Kelsey Doerksen, Jannik Kossen, Yarin Gal, 17 Jul 2022

13 OATML Conference papers at NeurIPS 2021

OATML group members and collaborators are proud to present 13 papers at NeurIPS 2021 main conference. …

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Jannik Kossen, Neil Band, Aidan Gomez, Clare Lyle, Tim G. J. Rudner, Yarin Gal, Binxin (Robin) Ru, Clare Lyle, Lisa Schut, Atılım Güneş Baydin, Tim G. J. Rudner, Andrew Jesson, Panagiotis Tigas, Joost van Amersfoort, Andreas Kirsch, Pascal Notin, Angelos Filos, 11 Oct 2021

Introducing the Shifts Challenge

We have released the Shifts benchmark for robustness and uncertainty quantification, along with our accompanying NeurIPS 2021 Challenge! We believe that Shifts, which includes the largest vehicle motion prediction dataset to date, will become the standard large-scale evaluation suite for uncertainty and robustness in machine learning. …

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Neil Band, Andrey Malinin, Panagiotis Tigas, Yarin Gal, 06 Aug 2021

Are you looking to do a PhD in machine learning? Did you do a PhD in another field and want to do a postdoc in machine learning? Would you like to visit the group?

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Contact

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